Technique of the week #7: Graphic/Visual/Performance Arts

Have you ever heard of the phrase “a picture is worth a thousand words”? Well, just as a lengthy novel can tell an intricate tale, so too can something as simple as a single image. Graphic, visual, and performance arts are media that encompass the two-dimensional (calligraphy, photography, drawing, painting ect), the three-dimensional (cermaics, sculpture, filmmaking ect) and performances presented to an audience. Unlike the traditional forms of information dissemination, graphic, visual, and performance arts allow for a relatively increased level of end-user interpretation which depending on the message being portrayed may be of great benefit.

Resources, time, and skill

Just like any tool used to portray a message, a certain level of resources, time, and skill is required to utilize, graphic, visual, performance arts. However, the amount of resources, time, and skill that needs to be expended depends on the medium and message you choose to use. For example, it can be argued that a photograph used to elicit a certain emotional response will be far easier to obtain than an interpretive dance recital used to the same end.

Key considerations

The main aspect that needs to be considered when employing the use of graphic, visual, and performance arts is whether or not the use of such tools are warranted given the message being portrayed. Although such tools are great at catching the attention of the masses given their “out of the box” nature, if a truly complex message needs to be disseminated a more straightforward approach may be needed.

The take away

Graphic, visual, and performance arts are a novel way to disseminate knowledge because they capture the attention of people and present them a message while allowing the freedom of personal interpretation. The use of such a KM tool depends highly on the message being disseminated.

Other resources

The following is a list of other resources and services related Graphic/Visual/Performance Arts that you may be interested in:

  • Meggs, Phillip B. “Graphic Design.” Encyclopædia Britannica. 2010. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 26 Oct. 2010<http://www.britannica.in the Graphic Arts and Computer Graphics (Career Resource Library). June 2000. New York: Rosen Publishing Group, 1999.
  • Different Forms of Art- Applied Art. Buzzle.com.
  • Carlson, Marvin (1998 (first 1996)).Performance: A Critical Introduction. London and New York: Routledge. pp. 1, 2.ISBN 0-415-13703-9.

 

 

 

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